Ferruccio Gard | Luca Beatrice PAINTING CANNOT BE TAUGHT, PANTING TEACHES US TO SEE – 2013
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Luca Beatrice PAINTING CANNOT BE TAUGHT, PANTING TEACHES US TO SEE – 2013

( from presentation of the monograph “ Chromatic energies/Works 1969-2013”, November 2013).

His work has distant origins in the experimental art that appeared in Italy after World War II, including Gruppo Uno, Gruppo T,Concrete Art and Op Art. His canvases convey the emotions and creative joy that the artist developed in his youth, a time of economic boom at the end of the 1950s and into the 1960s. These sentiments still drive the spirit of optimism that is evident in his work and contribute to making the artist a leading figure in the Italian Abstract Art scene. His first works are part of the creative fabric of the 1970s and fit into the final avant-garde movements of the past century – Kinetic and Programmed Art. After his first invitation to exhibit at the Venice Biennale in 1982, when he was just over 30 years old, his artistic production and career grew exponentially. He participated in six more Venice Biennales and was invited to exhibit at the XI Rome National Quadriennale in 1986. When looking at his work, it is impossible not to recognize a mature stylistic fusion attributable to two important branches of Abstract Art.
The first ensues from an analysis of the artist’s background (originally from Valle
d’Aosta-Piedmont, he later moved to Veneto) and includes such works as Kinetic paintings, grids and geometric hyperbolic transformations of square modules. The second, expressed as patches of colour that divide the surface of the painting into luminescent pixels that fuse into an orderly, unified whole, evinces a gestalt nature and echoes the abstract mysticism formulated first by Malevich and later by the Americans Rothko and Newman.
…This new chromatic series acts as a foil to the even more dynamic sensitivity to colour apparent in the second series, which features a range of exciting colours that are increasingly complicated, complex and experimental. In the series Optical Emotion, the squares are transformed into lozenges and create new spaces where a peristaltic, almost wavelike movement occurs, coming and going, advancing and receding, depending on the viewer’s position with
respect to the canvas. These works have a “multitude of compresent and simultaneous forms” (Umberto Eco) that converge towards an unstable centre of illusive three-dimensionality.
…His mimesis incorporates license that finds a reason to exist through abstraction and that moulds the sensible perception of the world through the figuration of emotions, feelings and states of being. Because, as Albers asserted, painting cannot be taught, painting teaches us to see.